Sects and the City

The Jewish Communities of Qumran and Alexandria

Sects and the CityCo-sponsored by Drisha, The Jewish Publication Society and Sixth Street Community Synagogue
November 29th, 7:00 PM
Sixth Street Community Synagogue
325 East Sixth Street

$10/students free of charge.

Please join us for an evening to celebrate the publication of Dr. Malka Z. Simkovich’s new book, Discovering Second Temple Literature: The Scriptures and Stories That Shaped Early Judaism (Philadelphia: The Jewish Publication Society, 2018).

Talks will be given by Dr. Malka Z. Simkovich (Drisha Faculty member and Crown-Ryan Chair of Judies Studies at Catholic Theological Union) and Dr. Lawrence Schiffman (Judge Abraham Lieberman Professorship in Hebrew & Judaic Studies at New York University).

We will explore the Jewish literature and communities of Alexandria and the Dead Sea Scrolls in Greek and Roman times, as Jews navigated as a minority through worlds dominated by powerful cultures.

Light refreshments will be served. Books will be available for purchase and signing.

Click here to register.

A reflection on the significance of the Dead Sea Scrolls

Significance of the Dead Sea ScrollsWhat better time to reflect on the significance of the Dead Sea Scrolls than now, soon after celebrating their 70th anniversary? This corpus of ancient manuscripts has awakened immense interest, spawned an entire new field of scholarship, and reshaped our understanding of biblical studies, the history of Judaism and the background of Christianity. The scrolls have been at the center of their share of intrigue, legal action and even humor. Exhibits such as that taking place right now in Denver, under the auspices of the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA), are more than ample evidence of the tremendous interest in the scrolls. But how many people can actually explain what the scrolls are and what they should mean to us?

Click here to read the rest of the Jerusalem Report article.

The Dead Sea Scrolls at 70

Exciting new developments point toward future progress

Dead Sea Scrolls at 70The field of Dead Sea Scrolls is never without important new developments. At the recent conference, “The Dead Sea Scrolls at Seventy: Clear a Path in the Wilderness,” there was exciting news about the ongoing development of technological tools for reading and identifying the remaining small scraps or wads (several layers of fragments stuck together) that did not find their place in the amazing jigsaw puzzle that had to be assembled to decipher the scrolls.

The announcement was made by Pnina Shor, curator of the Dead Sea Scrolls for the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA), at a public session conducted in Hebrew at which I had the honor of being a speaker. The conference was organized by the Orion Center for the Study of the Dead Sea Scrolls of the Hebrew University, the IAA, the Israel Museum, New York University, and the University of Vienna — all major players in scrolls research.

Read more at The Jewish Tribune.